About David Cox

David Cox is the Principle Owner of ThirdPartyBlogger.com. He is a career generalist, having served in six different career fields over the past 35 years. David writes to encourage those who choose to follow their varied interests by seeking opportunities to apply their multidisciplinary training and experiences to develop their current career role

Courage, Contribution, and Your Career Advancement

Courage is often required when employees endeavor to contribute to their organization. Courage is not always about heroic actions with life and death consequences. Sometimes, it takes courage to contribute to the organization and risk failure at work. What you contribute to the organization will ultimately determine your opportunities for career advancement. However, as an employee, it may take courage to make new decisions, assert yourself, share new ideas and risk others’ criticisms.

How a Positive Attitude Can Impact Your Career Momentum

The question of a positive attitude A positive attitude at work refers to an overall outlook, characterized by confidence in one’s job performance and the determination to fulfill essential responsibilities, regardless of any challenging circumstances. Is a positive attitude part of your strategy for keeping your career on track? I assure you that it is essential to your career objectives.

Your Inner Critic: How to Manage the Voice of Self-Doubt

The term inner critic is certainly not an original term. I use it to describe the voice in my mind that expresses my self-doubts whenever I consider a new career opportunity. My inner critic gives voice to all the reasons I will most likely fail if I choose to pursue the opportunity. It also reminds me that if I stay in a role that is familiar, it will seem safe and comfortable.

Asking Children: What Do You Want to Be When You Grow Up?

What do you want to be when you grow up? As a child, my ideas about how to answer this question changed frequently. Whenever I found a subject, industry, or a job that seemed interesting, I would “dive in” (a generalist’s attribute) and envision myself in those roles. My parents expected me to stay in school, and one day, have a career. I wanted to embrace that expectation but couldn’t figure out what I wanted to be when I grew up. However, I only wanted to pursue work in a particular field if I genuinely found it interesting.

The Career Path of the Generalist is Worth Consideration

Our society expects us to choose a career and focus on developing skills and expertise in “one field” for the rest of our lives. In other words, everyone expects us to have discovered our career choice and decide how we’re going to develop expertise and prepare to land our ideal job. Furthermore, we need to make many of our preliminary career choices and decisions before graduating from high school. A hundred years earlier, in a society with less complexity and diversity of career roles, the above goals and timetable probably seemed reasonable. However, maybe it’s time to consider that a generalist may also benefit from preparing for a diverse but progressive career.

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